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Futures Policy Forum Webinar #4

Topic: Implementing and Measuring Cultural Change to Achieve Quality of Life for Older Adults

The fourth FREE webinar of the AAG Futures Policy Forum took place on Wednesday, September 7th, 2022. View the recording, Webinar #4 Speaker Slides and other resources below.

Watch the recording!

Description

The webinar will focus on quality of life – what it means to older Albertans and how culture change can be implemented, measured and reported. Following a resident/family panel, speakers will share recent research on quality of life measures and public reporting along with examples of practices that can enhance quality of life, particularly for persons living with dementia. A question and answer session will provide opportunities for the public, older Albertans, families and care providers to offer advice and ideas on how to optimize quality of life.

Goals of this Webinar

    • To create awareness of how older people define quality of life in the community and in continuing care settings.
    • To share recent research on measures of quality of life and how data could be publicly reported.
    • To provide examples of cultural changes and practices that evidence shows can lead to enhanced quality of life, particularly for people living with dementia.
    • To engage with the public, older Albertans, family caregivers and care providers on ideas for culture changes in seniors’ services to optimize quality of life.

Resident/Family Panel

Topic: “What Quality of Life Means to Me”

  • Jim Mann, Dementia Advocate, Vancouver, BC
  • Lisa Poole, Family member & Advocate, Calgary, AB
  • Jim Dolph, United Active Living Resident, Calgary, AB

Webinar #4 Speakers

Topic: “Quality of life for long-term care residents: measurement, predictors, and directions for policy.”

Topic: The influence of COVID-19 outbreaks, care staff burnout, and several other factors on the quality of life of individuals receiving continuing care.”

  • Dr. Sienna Caspar, Faculty of Health Sciences – Therapeutic Recreation Program, University of Lethbridge

Topic: “Improving Quality of Life in Continuing Care: From rhetoric to reality.”


Speaker Bios

 

Dr. Tetyana Schippee is a social gerontologist with a Dual-Title PhD in Sociology and Gerontology. She is a tenured Associate Professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota, School of Public Health, and Associate Director for Research at the Center for Healthy Aging and Innovation. She spent two years living in a long-term care facility to better understand factors that impact quality of life for older adults in long-term care settings.

Her work aims to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in access to and use of long-term services and supports and improve quality of life for older adults. She was recognized as the University of Minnesota President’s Community-Engaged Scholar for Public Health and has a broad network of community collaborators and partners, including the state chapter of MN Diverse Elders Coalition. She leads multi-million dollar projects to address equity and quality of life in long-term care, funded by the AHRQ, the NIH, and MN Department of Human Services. She was elected to serve on the advisory Board of the Gerontological Society of America and is the Vice Chair-Elect of the GSA’s Section on Research, Policy and Practice.


Dr. Matthias Hoben is a registered nurse and holds an undergraduate degree in nursing management, an an MSc and doctoral degree in health and nursing sciences. He is an Associate Professor and Helen Carswell Chair in Dementia Care with the School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto. His research focuses on evaluating and improving the quality of life of older individuals living with dementia, as well as, the health and well-being of their paid and unpaid caregivers.

Examples of his research projects include:

  • a study to assess the feasibility of routinely measuring and publicly reporting the quality of life of individuals living with dementia in assisted living and long-term care,
  • studies on assessing the impact of COVID-19 on those who live and work in assisted living and long-term care homes (including an evaluation of the impact of COVID-19 on resident quality of life),
  • an evaluation of health and social services in the York Region, Toronto, aimed at supporting individuals living with dementia and their families to prevent or delay institutionalization and improve their quality of life.

Dr. Sienna Caspar is an Associate Professor at the University of Lethbridge in the Faculty of Health Sciences—Therapeutic Recreation program. Her areas of research include: organizational behaviour, empowerment, interprofessional teamwork and collaboration, quality of care and quality of work-life in dementia care.

Dr. Caspar is a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) and a dementia care specialist; she has worked as a clinician and consultant in long-term care homes in both Canada and the United States for over 20 years.


Webinar #4 Speaker Slides

Resident/Family Panel Bios

 

Diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2007 at the age of 58, Jim Mann has been active in the community promoting the inclusion of the voice of lived experience and seeking to reduce the stigma of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia through volunteering in the community, collaborating with researchers on research projects, and through writing as a published author. Current research projects include a focus on technology and robots in long-term care; the reduction of stigma and the promotion of social inclusion of people with dementia; and investigating consent and engagement in research with people with dementia, ethically and legally.

Jim is a member of the CIHR Institute of Aging Older Adult Advisory Council, Advisory Council of Research Ethics BC, and the Research Management Committee of AGE-WELL NCE, which is focused on technologies and services for healthy aging. He is also a member of the World Health Organization’s Global Dementia Observatory focus group.

In recognition of his advocacy efforts toward the rights of people with lived experience of dementia, he was awarded in 2020 an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University of British Columbia.


Lisa Poole is a family care partner and provides insight from a perspective of lived experience. Her father John, recently deceased, lived with dementia and resided in LTC. Lisa sits on Dementia Network Calgary’s Strategic Council, Alzheimer Society of Calgary’s Board of Directors, AGE-WELL’s Older Adult and Caregiver Advisory Committee, is co-chair of Dementia Advocacy Canada and the founder of Dementia Connections Magazine.


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